Daikon Tsukemono Recipe

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5 hours ago Peel the daikon and cut into ¼-inch (6 mm) slabs and then into sticks. Peel the carrot, cut into thin slabs, and then cut into thin …

Rating: 4.6/5(15)
Total Time: 50 mins
Category: Side Dish
Calories: 77 per serving
1. Gather all the ingredients.
2. In a small saucepan, combine 1 cup rice vinegar, ½ cup sugar, and 2 tsp salt. Whisk well to combine over medium heat. Once boiling, turn off the heat. Let cool to room temperature.
3. Peel the daikon and cut into ¼-inch (6 mm) slabs and then into sticks.
4. Add ¼ cup Amazu into the bag and combine with vegetables.

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Just Now Tsukemono pickled Daikon served at aunt keiko’s table. After you pickled the daikon, leave it for a week. Since making my last batch, I have been eating it as a side dish …

Rating: 4.8/5(13)
Calories: 639 per serving
Category: Side Dish
1. Wash the daikon radish and slice it about 15cm long and 5mm thickness.
2. Sprinkle salt over the sliced daikon and toss them to evenly coat daikon with salt.
3. Leave it for 6-7 hours.
4. Combine the rice vinegar, mirin, and sugar in a small saucepan. Bring it to boil over medium heat, when all the sugar has dissolved, turn the heat off and let it cool down.

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4 hours ago Daikon Tsukemono (Radish Pickles) Most Japanese meals are served with vegetable pickles, tsukemono. The pickling is done in various methods depending on desired flavor and length of storage. Some are preserved for only 1-2 days to 5-10 years. • Daikon (giant white radish) • 1/3 cup salt • 2 1/2 cups sugar • 1/2 cup vinegar • Chile pepper

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3 hours ago Japanese radish (non-spicy) recipe is the perfect compliment to any dish because it's salty-sweet, sour, and crunchy.Use fresh Daikon when preparing pickles.

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7 hours ago Root vegetables like daikon radishes are especially delicious in winter months, so let’s grab some daikon at your local Japanese or Asian grocery store and make this easy …

Rating: 4.4/5(91)
Total Time: 2 hrs 10 mins
Category: Side Dish
Calories: 34 per serving
1. Gather all the ingredients.
2. Peel daikon and cut into ¼ inch (6 mm) slices.
3. Cut the chili peppers into small pieces and discard the seeds if you prefer less spicy.
4. Put all the ingredients in a resealable plastic bag and rub well.

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1 hours ago In essence, takuan is a Japanese daikon pickle recipe, although you might also know takuan by other names, including: takuwan; takuan-zake; danmuji; In Japan, usually you …

Reviews: 1
Category: Pickling
Cuisine: Japanese
Total Time: 40 mins
1. Peel the radish and then slice it thinly as desired (see notes).
2. Sprinkle with salt and leave for 2 hours in order to draw out moisture.
3. Place the salt, sugar, vinegar, water and turmeric in a saucepan and bring to a boil.
4. Continue stirring the pickling mixture until all the salt and sugar have dissolved. Set aside to cool down.

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2 hours ago Tsukemono, which are pickles fermented in rice bran (Nukadoko), is the perfect companion to plain steamed rice.This is because of the refreshingly acidic taste and aroma …

Rating: 4.9/5(10)
Total Time: 240 hrs 10 mins
Category: Condiments, Pickles
Calories: 82 per serving
1. Boil the water in order to remove chlorine and set aside to cool down.
2. Place the roasted rice bran into the container that is used for pickle
3. Add salt to the roasted rice bran and mix them well
4. Pour the cooled down water into the container and mix them well with hands

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9 hours ago Tsukemono (漬物) Tsukemono literally translates to “pickled thing,” and it’s the Japanese umbrella term for pickles. Unlike many Western pickles, …

Rating: 4/5(2)
Calories: 15 per serving
Category: Condiments & Pickles
1. If you are using a different quantity of vegetables, weigh them, and then multiply that number by .03. This will give you the amount of salt to add. For example, in this recipe, we're using a total of 685 grams of vegetables, and 3% of 685 is about 20 grams of salt.
2. Toss all of the ingredients together and pack them into a large zipper bag.
3. Press out any excess air from the bag and seal it. Put the bag in a tray and cover with another smaller tray that's weighted down with cans.
4. The asazuke is ready to eat when the cabbage has released a lot of liquid and has become translucent.

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2 hours ago How to store. First, separate the leaves and the root which preventing the root from drying out. A whole root: Wrap up with newspaper and keep in a cold and dark place or the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Partially used root: Wrap it up …

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3 hours ago Takuan is pickled Japanese daikon radish, and as such, it belongs to the group of tsukemono pickles. The Japanese daikon is very crunchy and has sweet and mild flavors. It's typically sun-dried, seasoned with salt and various spices, then left in the pickling solution of turmeric, rice wine vinegar, sugar, salt, and water for a few months.

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Just Now Directions: 1. Wash and cut Daikon (with skin is ok) into 1/2 or 1/4 slices. Rub with 1/2 tsp. salt and leave for 20 min. Rinse and drain well.. 2. In a sauce pan or microwave, heat vinegar, sugar and a pinch of salt mixture until it comes to a boil.. 3.

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7 hours ago Takuan is a Japanese dish of fermented daikon radish. It is a form of Tsukemono (Japanese pickled veggies), which are served as side dishes or snacks, and are even part of the Japanese tea ceremony. Takuan in particular is often served at the end of meal to help digestion. The name “Takuan” is often attributed to Takuan Soho, a 17th century

Estimated Reading Time: 2 mins

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3 hours ago Recipe – Quick Pickled Diakon: – Skin the daikon, then start slicing it into thin strips. – Sprinkle the daikon with salt, then let it sit for about 2 hours to pull out some of the water and develop some crunch. – While the daikon is salting, add the sugar, water, vinegar and sake to a small pan and bring to a boil.

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9 hours ago Japanese Pickled Daikon Radish (Tsukemono) Japanese Cooking Video Recipe Japanese radish (non-spicy) recipe is the perfect compliment to any dish because it's salty-sweet, sour, and crunchy. Use fresh Daikon when preparing pickles.

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6 hours ago Cut the daikon leaves into small pieces. They should be crunchy and the knife should chop into the leaves with a "crispy" sound. Heat up a pan with some oil and add the …

Reviews: 2
Cuisine: Japanese
1. Separate the daikon leaves from the daikon. Try farmers' markets for daikons with intact leaves if you can't find these at your local grocery. Mom often gets hers at Palama Market.
2. Add Hawaiian sea salt to the daikon leaves. Let it sit for a while, then mix and massage to get most of the water out. After about 15 minutes, give it a final twist and squeeze like an old rag.
3. Cut the daikon leaves into small pieces. They should be crunchy and the knife should chop into the leaves with a "crispy" sound.
4. Heat up a pan with some oil and add the daikon leaves to let them brown a bit first. Add brown sugar, shoyu, and hot sauce. Mom used sriracha since it was available and easy. If you do add shoyu, it will tinge the daikon leaves brown. So if you're going for looks, it might be better to leave it off. However, she recommends using it as it contrasts with the brown sugar nicely and has it's own unique flavor. Cook on medium heat for 2 - 3 minutes.

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9 hours ago Tsukemono can be made via a wide array of techniques with vegetables and fruits fermented in salt, soy, miso, and even beds of rice bran …

Estimated Reading Time: 2 mins

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9 hours ago White radish and daikon are practically the same thing. Both of these recipes are a type of Japanese tsukemono (pickled things) which are very popular alongside main …

Reviews: 1
Category: Side Dish
Cuisine: Japanese
Total Time: 40 mins
1. Peel the radish and then slice it thinly as desired.
2. Sprinkle with salt and leave for 2 hours in order to draw out moisture.
3. Place the salt, sugar, vinegar, water and chillies in a saucepan and bring to a boil.
4. Continue stirring the pickling mixture until all the salt and sugar have dissolved. Set aside to cool down.

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2 hours ago Instructions. Prepare daikon: Peel daikon and cut it in half. Mix seasoning: Put shio koji, rice vinegar, sugar in a small bowl and mix well. Massage: Put daikon and the …

Reviews: 1
Calories: 25 per serving
Category: Salad
1. Peel daikon and cut it in half.
2. Put shio koji, rice vinegar, sugar in a small bowl and mix well.
3. Put daikon and the seasoning in a plastic bag, and massage them well.
4. Close the bag tight, put it in a container, and pickle for 2-3 days in the fridge.

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1 hours ago Cut daikon into 1/2" x 1 1/2" pieces. Pack daikon into a glass container. Bring salt, sugar and vinegar to a boil. Pour the hot vinegar solution over the daikon. Cover with lid. Refrigerate 3-4 days. Stir once or twice. This tsukemono is not intended for long keeping. Seeds for this recipe: Daikon (giant white radish) back to top of page

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7 hours ago MAKING TSUKEMONO . For those of you curious to try some Japanese pickles for yourself, here is a simple recipe for pickled daikon (Japanese radish) to try. chunk of daikon (~10 ounces) 5 tablespoons of ponzu (either bottled or homemade) 1 teaspoons of sugar. 1 teaspoon of sesame oil. red pepper flakes (~1/2 teaspoon or to taste) 1) Peel the daikon.

Estimated Reading Time: 7 mins

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7 hours ago How to make Recipe: 1. 2. 3. Peel the daikon, removing both ends and cut down the centre. Slice into half moons. Place them all in a large ziplock bag. Add sugar, salt, vinegar and yellow food dye. Seal the bag and massage for …

Rating: 5/5(4)
Calories: 481 per serving
Category: Condiment, Side Dish, Snack

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3 hours ago Instructions. Cut daikon, lotus root, cucumber and eggplant into small rectangular shape of 1cm x 1.5cm/⅜” x ⅝", 1-2mm/1⁄16" thick. Place eggplant pieces in water to prevent them from browning due to oxidisation. Add …

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4 hours ago Cut the daikon into 0.5-1cm thick slices. (Approx ¼ inch) Deseed the chili and break it into small pieces. Using scissors, cut the dry kombu into thin strips. Place the sliced daikon back into the ziplock bag with 150g amazake, …

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1 hours ago Instructions. Peel daikon. Thinly slice the daikon with a mandoline. Place slices in a big bowl. Mix sugar, salt, vinegar and turmeric and add to the daikon. Cover daikon with …

Rating: 5/5(1)
Total Time: 1 hr 15 mins
Category: Appetizer, Side Dish
Calories: 22 per serving
1. Peel daikon. Thinly slice the daikon with a mandoline. Place slices in a big bowl.
2. Mix sugar, salt, vinegar and turmeric and add to the daikon.
3. Cover daikon with sugar mixture and let sit for a couple of hours.
4. Place the Takuan in clean two 8 ounce mason jars and refrigerate.

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4 hours ago Peel Daikon and cut into sticks, 1 1/2 inches long, 1/2 inch wide. Put in a large bowl and coat with 1 tsp salt. Let it sit for 1 hour to release water. Peel the skin of Yuzu (without the white part) and cut thinly. Squeeze juice into another bowl and add the skin, remaining salt, rice vinegar, and sugar.

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9 hours ago For tsukemono daikon, first wash the radishes and slice into pieces about 15 cm x 5 mm. Transfer the slices to a bowl, sprinkle salt and toss to evenly coat them with salt. Set aside for 6 to 7 hours in a cool place. Next, combine the rice vinegar, mirin, and sugar in a small pan and bring it to boil over medium heat.

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7 hours ago Commonly pickled vegetables include daikon radishes, carrots, cucumber, japanese eggplants, cabbage, asian greens, burdock, lotus root, turnips, ginger, shallots, scallions and sour plums. Of course traditional cooks pickle many other items as well. Join me in this tsukemono adventure and try out one of my recipes.

Estimated Reading Time: 4 mins

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3 hours ago Please subscribe to my new channel. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDoWtnGek21N5WEyY_CSoBQThanks for you support.Takuan ( in Japanese ) and Danmuji ( in Ko

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3 hours ago Daikon is essentially a huge, mild, white radish, known in other parts of the world as mooli, winter radish, Japanese radish, Chinese radish or oriental radish. It is said to be an …

Rating: 5/5(1)
Category: Blog
Cuisine: Dairy Free, Gluten Free, Vegan
Total Time: 72 hrs 10 mins
1. Slice the daikon very thinly, either with a mandolin or sharp knife.
2. Put it in a bowl and mix in one tablespoon sea salt. Leave for at least a couple of hours. The salt will help the liquid to release from the daikon.
3. In the meantime make the 'brine' liquid in a pan. To make the liquid add the water, coconut sugar, rice vinegar, ground turmeric and black pepper. Simmer the liquid for a few minutes, until the coconut sugar dissolves into the liquid. Once done, put this mixture to the side to cool for later.
4. When the daikon has been left for least two hours with the salt, then use your hands to squeeze the water out. Discard the excess water.

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Just Now Popular Vinegar Based Pickling Recipe. You find hundreds of varieties of tsukemono in Japanese cuisine — if it’s a vegetable, you can pickle it — but one of the most …

Servings: 5
Estimated Reading Time: 3 mins
Category: Appetizer
Total Time: 20 mins
1. Scrub the daikon. Trim away the leafy green portion on top. Peel away any discolored portions of the skin.
2. Slice the daikon into short batonettes (essentially 2-inch-long French-fry-sized pieces). Place the daikon into a glass jar and set aside.
3. Heat the sugar and vinegar on the stove over low heat until the sugar dissolves. Remove the sugar-vinegar mixture from the heat and set aside to cool. Add the mixture to a glass jar.
4. Next, add the pickling salt, kombu, sake and red chili peppers to the sugar-vinegar mixture. Close the jar and shake well.

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6 hours ago Mix 3 tablespoons salt, 3-3/4 cups sugar and 1 cup vinegar into a bowl. Mix well. Add the sliced daikon and mix thoroughly. Let the daikon mixture soak on the counter overnight, stirring occasionally. In the morning, squeeze the daikon and pack it into jars. Then boil the juice and add a few drops of yellow food coloring.

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6 hours ago Tsukemono Recipes From Hawaii. Just Now Tsukemono Recipes From Hawaii.Just Now Tsukemono Recipes From Hawaii. 6 hours ago Make tsukemono water by combining remaining water, remaining salt, mirin, and monosodium glutamate in a large pot or bowl. Add to the cabbage pot and replace 2 pots on top. Let sit for another 24 hours at room temperature.

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5 hours ago Instructions. Place a daikon disc on a cutting board, circle face down. Slice 3mm (⅛") thick, then cut the slices same direction into 3mm (⅛") …

Rating: 5/5(1)
Category: Salad
Cuisine: Japanese
Total Time: 10 mins
1. Place a daikon disc on a cutting board, circle face down. Slice 3mm (⅛") thick, then cut the slices same direction into 3mm (⅛") matchsticks. Leave the daikon sticks in a bowl filled with chilled water (not in ingredients) for 5 minutes to make them crisp.
2. Slice persimmon vertically into 3mm (⅛") thick slices, then cut the slices the same direction into 3mm (⅛") matchsticks.
3. If mizuna leaves are large in relation to persimmon and daikon, cut them into two.
4. Place persimmon, daikon and mizuna in a bowl.

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1 hours ago 5 kg very fresh daikon radish with leaves; 240 g coarse pickling salt (it should be a total of 6% of the daikon w eight – please note this is very low, so the pickle won’t keep more than 2 months, 3 at the outside. You can safely increase to 10% for longer storage.) ½ kg raw rice bran (roughly 7½% by w eight of the semi-dried daikon); 75 ml by volume coarse brown …

Estimated Reading Time: 9 mins

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8 hours ago Tsukemono pickled Daikon served at aunt keiko's table. After you pickled the daikon, leave it for a week. Since making my last batch, I have been eating it as a side dish and even as a snack sometimes. I really love pickled daikon radish! If you liked this Tsukemono recipe from my aunt, please rate the recipe and leave comments below.

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9 hours ago Sauerkraut Tsukemono. sauerkraut • fresh ginger, cut into thin stripes • cucumber, cut into thin stripes • canned tuna, drained • soy sauce • drizzle of sesame oil • sesame seeds • dry calendula petals you find for tea (optional) 5 mins. 4 servings. Sesame and Lilies.

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5 hours ago Popular pickled vegetables include Chinese cabbage, daikon radish, carrots, bamboo, turnips, gobo (burdock root), ginger, Japanese cucumbers, and Japanese eggplant. Tsukemono offer color, texture and aroma to a meal, the earliest known tsukemono were called konomono or "fragrant things".

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2 hours ago In Japan, tsukemono or pickles are used as hashi-yasume, literally "chopstick resters", side dishes that have a totally different texture and flavor.So for instance if you had some grilled meat with a sweet-savory sauce as the main course, you might have some simple, crunchy pickled cucumber slices to go with it.

Estimated Reading Time: 3 mins

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2 hours ago After peeling off the skin and cutting it into long strips, it should be dried in the sun for a day or two. It can then be used throughout the year, after being reconstituted with water. Kiriboshi daikon can be used in various ways, for example in tsukemono pickles or with soy sauce and mirin or sugar in nimono (simmered dishes).

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7 hours ago Daikon, Carrot, and Cucumber Tsukemono . Pin Share Email Print Save Remove search. Advanced Search. Home > Asian Recipes > Daikon, Carrot, and Cucumber Tsukemono Daikon, Carrot, and Cucumber Tsukemono. Ingredients. 1 / 2 pound (225 gm) daikon, peeled and cut into paper thin

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8 hours ago This recipe is straight out of Ikuko Hisamatsu’s stellar book on Tsukemono which I highly recommend to anyone interested in making killer Japanese-style pickles. Don’t worry fellow Gaijins, it’s translated into English and has tons of pictures for each recipe. Soy-Pickled Daikon Radish (Fills 1 Small Mason Jar) Ingredients

Estimated Reading Time: 3 mins

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4 hours ago Drain the excess liquid that the cucumbers have released and pat dry with a lint-free towel or paper towel. Combine the soy sauce, vinegar, coconut sugar, ginger and chili …

Rating: 5/5(4)
Total Time: 50 mins
Category: Sides
Calories: 30 per serving
1. Chop the cucumbers into 1/2 inch pieces. Transfer the cucumbers into a large bowl and coat with salt. Allow it to sit for 30 minutes.
2. In the mean time, measure out the rest of the ingredients. Slice the red chili pepper and thinly slice the ginger.
3. Drain the excess liquid that the cucumbers have released and pat dry with a lint-free towel or paper towel.
4. Combine the soy sauce, vinegar, coconut sugar, ginger and chili pepper over medium heat and simmer until the sugar dissolves. Add in the cucumbers and bring the heat up to medium high. Allow the cucumbers to simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and allow it to cool at room temperature.

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7 hours ago Add dashi, soy sauce, salt, and mirin in the pot, and heat over medium low heat. Drop Otoshibuta on the daikon pieces, so that a small amount of cooking liquid can reach all over without turning the daikon pieces. Cook about 30 minutes, then turn off the heat. Let the pot cool down completely to absorb the flavor.

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5 hours ago 1/4 cup brown sugar, firmly packed. 1 chili pepper. Cut head cabbage and mustard cabbage into 1/2 in pieces. Place in a large container. Sprinkle Hawaiian salt over cabbage, mix well. Let stand for about 1/2 hour. Squeeze out excess water from vegetables and place back in container. Add sesame seed and Ajinomoto.

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Frequently Asked Questions

How much daikon do you need to pickle tsukemono?

Aunt Keiko told me that she usually uses 5-10 kg of Daikon to pickle. She says she prepares Tsukemono in bulk because it makes it more delicious. However, all of the vegetables are ginormous compared to its size, but Daikon is actually smaller.

How do you make daikon and yuzu?

Peel Daikon and cut into sticks, 1 1/2 inches long, 1/2 inch wide. Put in a large bowl and coat with 1 tsp salt. Let it sit for 1 hour to release water. Peel the skin of Yuzu (without the white part) and cut thinly. Squeeze juice into another bowl and add the skin, remaining salt, rice vinegar, and sugar.

How do you use daikon in japanese cooking?

Japanese use Daikon in cooking in a variety of ways. For instance, in Oden (fish cake stew), Miso Soup, Kouhaku Namasu (radish and carrot vinaigrette salad), Rafute (Okinawa braised pork belly) and garnishing grated daikon for Tempura and Tataki.

How do you eat tsukemono?

Commonly, tsukemono is served with rice dishes or in a bento (lunch box), but they are often an acceptable side dish for any meal: breakfast, lunch, or dinner. There are many varieties of pickled daikon available for sale at the supermarket, but these pickles can very easily be made at home.

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