Jim Lahey Bread Recipes Variations

Jim Lahey’s no-knead bread recipe turned traditional bread making upside down for all of us. Made with just flour, yeast, salt, and water, …

Rating: 4.9/5(107)
Total Time: 3 hrs 30 mins
Category: Sides
Calories: 85 per serving
1. In a large bowl, stir together the flour, yeast, and salt. Add the water and mix with a spoon or your hand until you have a shaggy, sticky dough. This should take roughly 30 seconds. You want it to be a little sticky. (Many people who bake this bread find the dough to be sticker than other bread doughs they’ve worked with. Even though it’s not what you’re accustomed to handling, it’s perfectly fine.)
2. Cover the bowl with a plate, towel, or plastic wrap and set it aside to rest at warm room temperature (but not in direct sunlight) for at least 12 hours and preferably about 18 hours. (Ideally, you want the room to be about 72°F. In the dead of winter, when the dough will tend to rise more slowly, as long as 24 hours may be necessary.) You’ll know the dough is properly fermented and ready because its surface will be dotted with bubbles. This long, slow fermentation is what yields the bread’s rich flavor.
3. Generously flour your work surface. Use a bowl scraper or rubber spatula to turn the dough onto the surface in one blob. The dough will cling to the bowl in long, thread-like strands and it will be quite loose and sticky. This is exactly what you want. Do not add more flour. Instead use lightly floured hands to gently and quickly lift the edges of the dough in toward the center, effectively folding the dough over onto itself. Nudge and tuck in the edges of the dough to make it round. That’s it. Don’t knead the dough.
4. Generously coat a cotton towel (not terry cloth) with flour, wheat bran, or cornmeal. Place the dough, seam side down, on the towel and dust the surface with a little more flour, bran, or cornmeal. Cover the dough with another cotton towel and let it rise for about 2 hours. When it’s ready, the dough will be double in size and will hold the impression of your fingertip when you poke it lightly, making an indentation. If the dough readily springs back when you poke it, let it rise for another 15 minutes.

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Jim Lahey, founder of Sullivan Street Bakery in New York City, has a no-knead bread recipe that just uses a cast iron dutch oven, flour, …

Servings: 6-8
Category: Baking Recipes
1. In a medium bowl, stir together the flour, salt, and yeast. Add the water. Use a wooden spoon or your hand to mix until you have a wet, sticky dough—about 30 seconds. Make sure it’s really sticky to the touch; if it’s not, mix in another 1-2 tablespoons of water. Cover the bowl and let set at room temperature, out of direct sunlight, until the surface is dotted with bubbles and the dough is more than doubled in size (about 12-18 hours).
2. When the first fermentation is complete, generously dust a work surface with flour. Use a rubber spatula to scrape the dough onto the surface in one piece. When you begin to pull the dough away from the bowl, it will cling in long, thin strands (this is the developed gluten), and it will be quite loose and sticky—do not add more flour. Use lightly floured hands or a bowl scraper or spatula to lift the edges of the dough in toward the center. Nudge and tuck in the edges of the dough to make it round.
3. Place a cotton or linen tea towel (not terry cloth, which tends to stick and may leave lint in the dough) or a large cloth napkin on your work surface and generously dust the cloth with wheat bran, cornmeal, or flour. Use your hands, a bowl scraper, or wooden spatula to gently lift the dough onto the towel so it is seam-side down. If the dough is tacky, dust the top lightly with wheat bran, cornmeal, or flour. Fold the ends of the towel loosely over the dough to cover it and place it in a warm, draft-free spot to rise for 1-2 hours. The dough is ready with it is almost doubled. If you gently poke it with your finger, making an indentation about ¼-inch deep, it should hold the impression. If it doesn’t, let it rise another 15 minutes.
4. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees F 30 minutes before the end of the second rise, with a rack in the lower third position, and place a cast iron dutch oven in the center of the rack.

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Directions In a medium bowl, stir together the flours, salt, and yeast. Add the water and, using a wooden spoon or your hand, mix Cover …

Rating: 4.8/5(24)
Total Time: 1 hr 30 mins
Category: Sides
Calories: 84 per serving
1. In a medium bowl, stir together the flours, salt, and yeast. Add the water and, using a wooden spoon or your hand, mix until you have a wet, sticky dough, about 30 seconds.
2. Cover the bowl and let it sit at room temperature until the surface is dotted with bubbles and the dough has more than doubled in size, 12 to 18 hours.
3. Generously dust a work surface with flour. Use a bowl scraper or rubber spatula to scrape the dough onto the surface in 1 piece. Using lightly floured hands or a bowl scraper or spatula, lift the edges of the dough in toward the center. Nudge and tuck in the edges of the dough to make it round.
4. Place a clean towel on your work surface and generously dust it with wheat bran, cornmeal, or flour. Gently place the dough on the towel, seam side down. If the dough feels tacky or sticky, dust the top lightly with wheat bran, cornmeal, or flour.

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This bread recipe was first published in 2006 to much acclaim, but somehow I missed the broohaha when it was going on. I know folks posted versions of it here on the board, too. What I'd like to hear about are your experiences with it, and any variations you've used, etc. Thanks in advance! *** Jim

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10 No-Knead Bread Recipes You Can Make With 10 Ingredients or Less. 1. Jim Lahey's No-Knead Bread. This is the OG no-knead bread recipe that started it all. This recipe can be mixed entirely by hand, which is super 2. Rosemary No-Knead Bread. 3. Basic No-Knead Bread. 4. Miracle No-Knead Bread.

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Jim Lahey’s No-Work Bread. By Hklbrries. From “How to Cook Everything,” by Mark Bittman. This is the original, foolproof recipe. Use it as the basis …

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The Spruce / Diana Rattray. For this incredibly easy no-knead bread, all you need is some parchment paper, a Dutch oven, and time to let it rise.The bread is made with a very small amount of yeast and rises over a period of 12 to 18 hours. Just combine the ingredients in a mixer or by hand and let the yeast do all of the heavy work while you sleep.

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All cool recipes and cooking guide for Jim Lahey My Bread Recipe are provided here for you to discover and enjoy Jim Lahey My Bread Recipe - Create …

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Let rise for another 2 hours. Forty-five minutes before the dough is ready, preheat the oven to 450°F. Place a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic: I’ve used a ceramic Emile Henry Dutch oven and a circular Pyrex baking dish) on a rimmed sheet pan and place in the oven while it heats.

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Preparation. In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Add 1 1/2 cups/345 grams water and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest at least 12 hours, preferably about 18, at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees. Dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles.

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Home » Recipes. Jim Lahey’s Easy No-Knead Artisan Bread. Recipes· Yeast Breads + Doughs ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ 4.9 from 26 reviews. By Emilie Raffa — March 1, 2013 (Updated September 18, 2020) — 197 comments

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All cool recipes and cooking guide for Jim Lahey Bread are provided here for you to discover and enjoy Jim Lahey Bread - Create the Most Amazing Dishes Healthy Menu

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Completely. While the idea of warm bread fresh from the oven is intoxicating, in reality, the bread is better if allowed to cool completely. The Magic Recipe Jim Lahey’s No-Knead Bread Makes one loaf. 1/4 tsp dry yeast 1-1/2 c cool water 3 c bread flour (wheat: 2c bread/1c wheat flour; rye: 2-1/4c bread/3/4c rye flour) 1-1/2 tsp salt

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Unfortunately, Jim Lahey's no-knead bread recipe is pretty flawed; it works for some, but a lot of us followed it to the letter and produced flat, gummy discs. Cook's Illustrated recently published a corrected version that is total perfection--*that's* the one you should use.

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I have made Jim Lahey’s bread since I first saw the recipe in the Times in November 2006. I’ll have to give it a try. I take it out of the pot and let it rest 5 minutes in the oven to crisp the bottom. This is the first time I made bread that proofed for this long. It …

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is jim laheys recipe for bread?

This classic recipe from Jim Lahey is easy, requires minimal handling, and is a great recipe for beginner bread bakers. In a large bowl, stir together the flour, yeast and salt. Add the water and stir together with a wooden spoon until all of the flour is moistened (the dough will be quite shaggy).

Is laheys pugliese bread easy to make?

The recipe is ridiculously easy, even for first-time bread bakers, and will make you wonder why you ever spent all that time and effort kneading dough in the past. The loaf is an adaptation of Lahey’s phenomenally and outrageously popular pugliese sold at Sullivan Street Bakery in Manhattan.

Is jim laheys no knead whole wheat bread healthy?

Jim Lahey’s no-knead whole-wheat bread is a brilliant innovation that brings you healthfulness with ease. And that’s to say nothing of the nutty, not overly healthful taste. More of that, please. –Renee Schettler Rossi This no-knead whole-wheat bread from Jim Lahey is quick to make but as good as old-fashioned bread.

Do you cut laheys bread in half?

I’m not a huge fan of sweet breads, but my husband loves them. I cut our recipe in half (back to Lahey’s original amounts) to make a smaller loaf. This bread is great toasted or served up as an afternoon snack.

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